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How a Client Was Saved

Q.1 Why had Rustomji’s smuggling offences not been discovered earlier?

Ans. Rustomji was a man of high repute. He was going a well with the customs officials, Therefore, his Smuggling offences had not been discovered earlier.

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OR

Rustomji’s smuggling offences had not been discovered earlier because he was on best terms with the customs officials; thus, nobody was inclined to suspect him. They used to consider his invoices on trust and had even pretended to be ignorant towards smuggling done by Rustomji.

Q.2. What did Rustomji consider to be the greatest cause for shame to him?

Ans. For Rustomji, going to jail was the greatest cause for shame.

OR

Rustomji considered the discovery of his guilt to be his destruction. But he was repentant for hiding about this offence of smuggling from his friend, Gandhi.

Q.3. What did Gandhiji consider to be a greater cause for shame?

Ans. Gandhiji considered the committing of offence a greater cause for shame.

OR

According to Gandhiji, the greater cause for shame was in committing the offence.

Q.4. Which words that Rustomji used to describe his offence show us that didn’t consider it to be a moral offence?

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Ans. Rustomji considered his smuggling merely as “the tricks of trade”. The words such as “the tricks of trade” used by Rustomji to describe his offence show us that he did not consider it to be a moral offence.

Q.5. Who, according to Gandhiji was the one who would finally decide whether Rustomji was to be saved or not?

Ans. According to Gandhiji, it was the customs officer who was to decide whether Rustomji was to be saved or not and, the customs officer was inturn to be guided by the Attorney General.

OR

According to Gandhiji, it was the customs officer who was to decide whether Rustomji was to be saved or not.

Q.6. Gandhiji and the other counsel differed in the way in which they thought the case ought to be handled. How did (a) Gandhiji and (b) the other counsel hope to settle the case?

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Ans. Gandhiji wanted Rustomji to make a confession and be ready for the consequences. The other counsel said that they should take the case to the court.

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OR

Gandhiji thought that the case shouldn’t be taken to court. It should be kept up to the customs officer to prosecute Rustomji or let him free.

The other council hoped that the case would be tried by a jury and a Natal jury would acquit Rustomji.

Q.7. Gandhiji spoke of two penances.

(a) What were they? (b) Which of them did Rustomji not have to do?

Ans. A) Gandhiji spoke of two penances. The first penance was to pay a penalty for the crime. The second penalty was imprisonment. But according to Gandhiji, the real penance was to resolve never to smuggle again.

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B) Rustomji did not have to be imprisoned because it would ruin his edifice.

Q.8. Why did Gandhiji have to go to the Attorney General as well as to the customs officer?

Ans. Gandhiji had to go to Attorney General as well as customs officer because both of them were employed in taxation process. Moreover, the customs officer was guided by the Attorney General. So, after persuading the custom officer, he had to motivate the Attorney General regarding the guilt. Moreover, Gandhiji wanted to convince them that Rustomji was really sorry and that he should not be prosecuted

Q.9. Which two qualities of Gandhiji’s helped him to persuade the Attorney General not to drag Rustomji into court.

Ans. Gandhiji’s persistence and frankness helped him to persuade the Attorney General not to drag Rustomji into court.

OR

It was Gandhiji’s frankness and his powers of persuasiveness that made him win over the Attorney General.

Q.10. What did Rustomji (a) lose (b) Partly save by the settlement of the case?

Ans. Rustomji lost a small part of his money in the form of a penalty. He partly saved his honour because he did not have to go to jail. OR
A) Rustomji lost twice the amount of money which he had earned by smuggling.

B) Rustomji partly saved his edifice by the settlement of the case.

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